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Law-Offices-of-Shawn-Seliger

Free Phone Consultations 24/7:
239-333-0077

We accept Visa, Mastercard and Discover
Cards

4 ways the state can help you enforce a child support order

On Behalf of | Oct 8, 2021 | Divorce |

Raising a child is not cheap. It requires thousands of dollars a year and countless hours of your time. It is only natural to expect the other parent to contribute to all of that work. When they don’t spend as much time with your child as you do, you can then typically request child support to help compensate you for the responsibilities that fall to you.

Child support only represents a fraction of what a child needs every month, but many parents who pay support still resent the obligation. When your ex doesn’t pay support in a timely manner, their failure could affect everything from your credit to your housing. What are some of the ways that the state of Florida could help you enforce a child support order that your ex doesn’t want to pay?

Automatic payroll withholding

Once you know where your ex works, you can report it to the state for enforcement. The government can make arrangements with the employer directly to withdraw money from each paycheck before it goes out to your ex and send those funds on to you for child support.

Liens against personal property

Some people will quit their jobs or take a new job where they work under the table so that they don’t have to pay child support out of each paycheck. If the state cannot obtain employment information or intercept wages, then they can place a lien against the non-paying parent’s vehicle or boat.

Refusing or suspending state-issued licenses

You need a Florida state license to drive or to fish. You also need a license to do business in a number of different professions. The state can refuse to issue a license to those seriously out of compliance with child support or can even suspend an existing license until they take steps to address the unpaid child support.

Taking action through the courts

The family courts issued your child support order, which means that a persistent refusal to pay is contempt of court. If other enforcement attempts are unsuccessful, you may need to initiate civil proceedings and have the family courts take action to either compel the other parent into payment or to hold them in contempt of court, which might even lead to a judge issuing a bench warrant for their arrest.